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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 11,176 (some duplicates have been removed)
is a little like in the spirit. it is something in common. i was flattered to do that, but it is beautiful to see how much they are -- our work, our demand is to make a beautiful movie. i should not be able to do anything. i never thought about it, but when people ask me, you have to be so clever. >> tom ford made a movie, so why not you? >> because my brain is not that sure. you have to think about so many things. truly, it is a big work. you have to be strong. you have to take care also of the physiology of the actor which is, like, oh, my god. you can be depressed. also, you see the depression of everybody. i do not want it. i have enough of my own. >> i hope you will be sharp enough to answer the questions the audience has for you. rather like the academy awards. [applause] these questions have come through on various means. can we have the first question? >> the first question -- i am going to compile a group -- a lot of people are asking what is currently inspiring new? from different cultures, the internet, textile design -- what exciting things are you seeing in contemporary textil
'm expressing my disdain for his authoritative ways. ha ha ha. geoff: i do love when you exert your powers, mr. ferguson. craig: good night, everyone.
. also, you see the depression of everybody. i do not want it. i have enough of my own. >> i hope you will be sharp enough to answer the questions the audience has for you. rather like the academy awards. [applause] these questions have come through on various means. can we have the first question? >> the first question -- i am going to compile a group -- a lot of people are asking what is currently inspiring new? from different cultures, the internet, textile design -- what exciting things are you seeing in contemporary textile design? and what are you reading? >> definitely, that is very sad, but i have not enough time to read. that is the very sad part. so i'm not enough reading, but i'm getting older and getting closer. now that nobody is doing any more reading, i will read. no, i think honestly, it is a question of time, but reading, to bring inspiration, but that is the problem. i get into a book and say that i can make a collection of that after, like, three lines. one time i did an existentialist collection years ago, and i was thinking, so i read a book to no more, to get int
confidantes to women. do you plan to try to block all or some of that plan? >> no. we have a process. i met with the undersecretary yesterday morning. the senate armed services committee can look incrementally as they make these changes. we can either talk them out of it or introduce legislation. if something that we do not know yet what they will come out with and they hear from the service chiefs, we will see what is reasonable. we will use our own judgment. i caution people who are hysterical about this. let's wait and see what they do. we will stop the bad stuff. >> the defense cemetery has said any exceptions will have to get approved by him. the implication is there are going to move fairly dramatically in this direction. do you have any concerns right now about what they have said so far about basically opening up all of these specialities to women? >> if they do that, they're going to have a fight on their hands. we do have that responsibility. if it means introducing legislation, that is one thing. we can be reasonable with them. the originally talked about 2016 when they would get
financing sources. but before you do that, the takeaway message here is that before you go to a bank, make sure you are cleared to do that. you do not want to go to a bank looking for financing for your business and ask them a question that will immediately give them a sense that you are not ready. you go to a bank and say, "how much can i borrow?" they will tell you, "i do not know, but probably not from us." you need to know exactly what you're looking for, how you are going to use the money, and how you will be paid the bank. part of the process is make sure you are prepared. the first thing you need to do is take a advantage of the resources that can help you develop your business plan and really be prepared to go to a lender. being able to answer the questions you know that they will be asking is part of what we do as well. i'm sure we will have lots of time for questions, but i will send it back to you. >> director of the office of small business with the city and county of san francisco. again, i also want to thank congresswoman pelosi for hosting this event, and with her staff, and
up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: when we launched the show in january 2004, one of our goals was to become a destination for the biggest names in music not only for a place to perform in a late night setting but a comfortable setting for conversation. we found it strange that on most late-night shows, musicians perform but seldom ever speak. if you weeks after we launched the show were paid a visit by one of the biggest artists on the planet, prince. this was his first time ever appearing on pbs. we decided to start the show differently before jumping into a terrific conversation. good evening from los angeles. tonight, prince on pbs. ♪ tavis: i am a fa
through some training. you have a question for our guests? >> no, but i want to thank you for doing this. thank you. without this we'd be back at scare one. >> thank you. >> have you seen bullying at your school? can you tell us a little about that? >> i don't have bullying like at the movie but it's kind of like, oh, she wore this, so. >> did somebody in your school do something about it? >> not really. the teachers don't see it. >> nobody wants to say anything to the teachers so they don't think this is a big deal. >> yeah. >> you've been through training to stop bullying so what does that mean? >> we'll try to stop it and we'll try to get them to stop saying those things. >> have you done that so far? have you been able to intercede? >> yeah. >> what happened? >> they stopped. >> nobody did anything bad to you? >> no. >> how did that make you feel? >> good. >> good job. thank you so much, honey. >> there are two things that she raises that i just want to highlight. one is the role of the teacher, what they can do and what can the peers do. i think one of the truisms that teachers
or the congress than what you said. name one dumb thing we have been goaded in to do because of the pressure of the israeli or jewish lobby. >> i have already stated that i regret the term nlg. >> you said back then it makes us do dumb things. you can't name one senator intimidated. now give me one example of the dumb things we're pressured to do up here. >> we were talking in that interview about the middle east. about positions. about israel. >> now that exchange followed another faceoff earlier today with senator john mccain over the war in iraq. >> will you please answer the question? will you correct or incorrect when you said that the surge would be the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since until nam? were you correct or incorrect? yes or no? >> my reference -- >> are you -- the question is,
are you talking about? i only offered you change for the phone. damn! i don't know what to do! i love my granddad. it's all getting to be such a mess! why is that? because! i thought my granddad could come home. my mom doesn't want him home. my parents had a fight last night. i don't know what's happening. the whole family's coming apart. i feel like it's my fault. sit down and relax. come on. your family's not falling apart. all families have arguments. i know. she said she'd leave if he came back. she's never said that. people get angrier when they're feeling guilty. your mom's feeling guilty because of your grandfather. your dad's feeling guilty for putting him in there. but who's right? that's something your folks have to work out. it has nothing to do with your relationship with your grandfather. you love him? sure. you'll help him? yeah, but-- no buts about it. you have to do what you think is right, regardless of your parents. nothing bad could come from helping. if you don't, there will be three of you feeling guilty. can i borrow that change? yeah. there you go. [telephone rings
up when people get permits. and my going to be able to recoup the value of the work to do when a property? how does my improvement or repair affect my property about you? we have guests today. jonathan, thanks for coming. james, and alice. alice is a neighbor. thanks for coming. i have a big hand out of stuff about what other people think values might be when you do work on your home. san francisco is a different world, isn't it? >> we have so many micro districts and pockets of different the used within two or three blocks. answering the question for one house may not always be the same as answering that question for different house. >> give us an idea. if you get a view, it will be different -- >> shore. the value of a simple remodel verses a very fancy kitchen remodel in a house that might be worth more than a condominium. those things can matter. it can make a difference. >> we have a request from one of our viewers to make sure we talk about -- home-improvement results and building taxes. >> accessible. >> the other thing that might be brought out his people over- improved
that we're dealing with h 3 n 2 means we should be concerned and make sure that we can do everything that we possibly can. the way to prevent it is the personal hygiene measures but also getting vaccinated. if you do get the flu and physicians know this and should know this, if somebody gets hospitalized or has serious flu or is in one of the high-risk groups like a pregnant individual, pregnant woman, a young child or an elderly individual over 65 or someone with a chronic condition, they should be treated with the anti-flu medicines, like tamaflu and we know that this influenza is sensitive to the anti-flu medications that we have. >> dr. fauci, thank you so much for joining us.
, arranging for people to come and do things at our house, getting ourselves to doctor's appoint mets and shopping on once those are more challenging, that is the firstpdy caution that what is going on here? where has the house gone from insulating to isolating. >> uh-huh. >> when we're raising a family, our house is there to protect us from the evils of the world. as we age and our children move away our for instances move away and pass on, we stop driving and our house is isolating. >> talk about the options. first of all, interviewing this conversation is -- introducing this subject is difficult for some people. most of them, like you said, we have this idea that we can do more than we think. >> uh-huh. >> what is the difference between a a lifted living, a nursing home, skilled nursing facility or an independent senior community where they seem to play golf all the time. >> sure. everyone loves the marketing ideas. i'm out there golfing. >> yeah. >> and i am going to be sky diving. there is a range. there is the over 55 communities, which really are just people united by the idea
, the basketball, the student counsel, the peer leaders. if the peer leader doesn't do the right thing -- and this is my initiative and if you don't do the right thing you don't look like what know what you're doing and that isn't cool and you didn't do your job that well, if we get in these ambassador programs and give them training and rigor and how difficult that moment can be you can transform a school because of the power of kids talking to each other. >> all right. do we have another question? >> i appreciate that point you have been making. been, wooing with the board and the foundation and launch the student advisory board and i think we need to get that training kicked in really fast and that's a point well taken, and i appreciate lee you showing that clip because it illustrates an important distinction that we need to make. we don't want to send the message to america that bullying is normative; that bullying is normal, and that clip illustrated that the school is sending that message, and there is a difference, an important distinction between the school sort of embodying
you to accomplish what is right for the city. how do we do that? >> [unintelligible] >> i blame these guys for conditions. this time, i will blame fee on the mall and senator leno. -- fiona ma and senator leno. their limited by statute, but that is very difficult to have much room to maneuver. >> you said to organize local bars. i have been trying to do that for a few years now. we have our sixth annual event coming up in september. we have been trying to get toger a long time. i am not a politician in do not care to be a politician. if i cannot raise the issue in that way, the way i have been doing it, personally i get quoted in esquire for what i have done, but i still have no connections. it is still up to me to do that? i am doing everything can. i do not know what else to do besides try to make a profit in a city that is over-taxing the and running down. [applause] >> i do think that you can do a lot through talking to your city supervisor and working through that process. i am telling you, there are ways that began help you. alcohol is a local issue on this type of matter
we are insured up to 250,000. we build credit. what we do a lot is one-on-one counseling. we are also a part of the bank of san francisco, so we do pay their lending -- payday lending. we help people build up their credit before helping them to get a bigger loan amount. especially people who want to start a small business. credit unions offer micro loans. we do a lot of micro loans up to $50,000. this is -- we check credit. we need a business plan. then we look at the three-year tax return and that statement. we do a lot of home care and mom-and-pop shops. we also do start ups. we asked for approval through documents. we work a lot with people who do not know how to file taxes properly. we are mainly focused in san francisco. we are small. we focus mainly on the tenderloin, chinatown, bayview, visitation. we do a lot of expansion. people start small through the credit union and then want to go to the bank. we know we are limited. we cannot afford to give out a big loan. starting from the credit union, we educate them about filing taxes properly and then moving on to the bank,
anytime you want me to come down here and talk with you, happy to do that. with that, i'm happy to take any questions. >> i may permit consultant in the city. i want to thank you for coming to this because it shows that you really care. i want to ask you a question. some of then transfers for an eatery that serves beer and wine to patrons, when someone wants to transfer or someone else wants to buy the license, if it says on there now live music or no entertainment, and the new person that -- no live music or no entertainment, and the new person that purchases it, they want to modify the conditions. they realize if a petition to modify the conditions, they run the risk of maybe not having the license transfer to them should the modifications be declined. some of these laws on the books a little archaic, and i will give you an example. we now have live entertainment in san francisco, which allows amplified music until 10:00 p.m. if the conditions has no entertainment, and the entertainment, it also includes this limited live provision. we have determined in the city that this leg
. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: david magee is now a two- time oscar-nominated writer, thanks to "life of pi," which is up for 11 oscars this year, including best picture. he are some scenes from "life of pi." >> i was sitting at a coffeehouse, and the old man next to be struck up a conversation, saying, "you have an amazing story." >> i was born and raised in one of the most beautiful places. i will always remember. but when our family choose to move our zoo halfway around the world, that is when my greatest journey began. the next part of the story you will find hard to believe. tavis: so everything readable is not the normal. when you walked on the set, i congratulate you for do
for their communities. i'm not trying to pin this on you guys or blame you guys, but we do try to work with you. we do not tend to want to overrule the police department very often. now that said, i get a fair number of petitions and appeals to me. typically, they are from the neighbors. i want to see that there is actually a practical problem posed -- that the condition is there to solve, not that this is the way the things have been or maybe there's someone who is satisfied by what is potentially wrought by having live entertainment. it is always a case by case. generally, very deferential -- i am very deferential to the removal of conditions that do not appear to be solving any problems, and by removing them we are narghile posing any problems that we cannot then thereafter solved. >> director apple smith, thank you for coming. i represent about 30 or 40 entertainment venues in san francisco, new york, and moscow is. i have a technical question about county transfers. -- and lost vegas. i have a technical question about county transfers. right now, there are very few buildings that you can lease in
. i want to introduce myself a little more so you have the context of what i do. i work for a nonprofit in seattle "committee for children" and we have been around for about 32 years. we're nonprofit and we do both education and advocacy and on the education end we develop be curriculum and the curriculum is used widely across the country. it's in every state in the country and in canada and 70 countries around the world and programs we're familiar with is second step and i am hearing some nods and we have a -- idea of kind of what kind of things that we do, and i also do advocacy work so i come and speak at meetings like this. i was at the attorney general's meeting in washington state and i would like to congratulate you and especially those in law enforcement in california for the high level of discourse that you have incredibly impressed today by what i have heard and my hats off to you for all the good work you're doing. so i do advocacy and part of that is kind of reaching out to people and bringing the message of social emotional learning not just to schools b
. >> i was going to end with general myat. i know we've trained soldiers to do that kind of thing. after the colorado fires just recently they did put a lot of soldiers that trained, so we do still have that program who can do that if the need warrants. any other questions from out there before i turn it over to general myat? let me thank our panel here. >> thank you. (applause). as we leave here today, we need to keep the ball moving forward. we can't -- i think most of us all here would agree, we really can't prevent the next disaster from happening. but by building the partnerships that we are here today and will continue to build in the future, we can certainly limit the number of deaths and long-term destruction. we can surge a lot of things: resources, people. but we cannot surge trust. so venues such as this is what helps us build that trust so that when the bell does go off we know -- a comment i made yesterday and i'd like to use it again in closing today, the most important thing for me to come out of this two-day seminar and sbat -- into the future is the ability
right. so we're all set and mia i would like you to enlighten us more in all that you're doing in social emotional learning. >> sure. i had some slides but i'm not sure -- no, we have a handout that went around to you and more detail about what social emotional learning is because i think we rise a little bit today and i came from seattle and i know many people have brought up that term today and i get the sense from this group that you're at kind of a high level of discourse and you have a general understanding. could i see a show of hands for those of you that social emotional learning is a familiar term? and those that feel you have a deep understanding of it? okay. great. thank you. i want to introduce myself a little more so you have the context of what i do. i work for a nonprofit in seattle "committee for children" and we have been around for about 32 years. we're nonprofit and we do both education and advocacy and on the education end we develop be curriculum and the curriculum is used widely across the country. it's in every state in the country and in canada
to watch. i think that is right. we should be doing more of that. the industry has to ask itself how glamorous do they make killings, at the same in a movie. there's nothing glamorous about somebody being killed. i was at a number of murder scenes when i was a prosecutor. there's nothing glamorous about that. i worry about people glamorizing it. the issue has been raised. we will ask about it. i do not think anybody in the senate has worked harder to defend the first amendment. i do not see a law that will ban of these beings. >> after the president announced his initiative and things like to see happen in congress, it seems clear that you like to see those things go through your commit see. i am wondering how you see that going forward. >> it is not going to go through the appropriations committee. this is not the jurisdiction. it is a lot of extra work for our committee. i want to set an example to everybody. we will have a hearing this month. we have this anywhere in the congress. it is there so we do get something done. we will hold this. i want to understand the legislative lang
kind of things that we do, and i also do advocacy work so i come and speak at meetings like this. i was at the attorney general's meeting in washington state and i would like to congratulate you and especially those in law enforcement in california for the high level of discourse that you have incredibly impressed today by what i have heard and my hats off to you for all the good work you're doing. so i do advocacy and part of that is kind of reaching out to people and bringing the message of social emotional learning not just to schools because educators kind of get it. it's not a stretch when we talk to them why it's important to get it, but we want to take the message outside of the school into the media, into the communities, into families so that people kind of understand this process of another way of learning and becoming an educated person. a couple of other things i do i work with anne on the board and with the foundation. that has been exciting. i do advising for sesame street. if you have small children the next seafn sesame street you will see some of the favorite
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 11,176 (some duplicates have been removed)

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